Air New Zealand’s flight attendant reveals security routine to avoid creep when checking into hotel

A flight attendant has revealed the security routine they do when they check in at a hotel (file photo).

ISTOCK

A flight attendant has revealed the security routine they do when they check in at a hotel (file photo).

A video of a flight attendant from Air New Zealand revealing a routine for a security check at the hotel achieved 64,000 views on social media, before it was suddenly deleted.

The video showed the procedure the flight attendants go through when entering a hotel room while at work.

The voiceover explains: “As a flight attendant, the first thing I do when I get to my hotel room is a quick security check.”

She then explains that the first step is to put the suitcases in the door to keep it open.

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The cabin crew member, in full uniform, then shows his first step. ‘I check under the beds, and I also check behind the curtains.

“I open the cloakroom and make sure no one hides inside, and then into the bathroom, and I check behind the shower curtain.”

She then gives a thumbs up to the camera, before explaining that she always makes sure that the lock over the door is locked when she is in her room.

Air New Zealand's international and domestic crews are encouraged to conduct a security check of the hotel before settling in.

Brook Sabin / Stuff

Air New Zealand’s international and domestic crews are encouraged to conduct a security check of the hotel before settling in.

The video was viewed more than 64,000 times on TikTok, but was deleted shortly after Things travel asked with Air New Zealand.

The airline’s general manager for Cabin Crew, Viv Vincent, said that Air New Zealand’s crew were very safety and security conscious when traveling on national and international routes.

“Security sweep of a hotel room is not a standard operating procedure, but our crew is taught and encouraged to do one as a precaution. This is standard practice throughout the aviation industry.

“The safety of our crew and pilots is crucial, so we have teams being sent to vet all hotels before any Air New Zealanders stay there as part of their duty journey,” Vincent said.

Airlines often get security specialists to teach staff how to perform security checks.

Other flight attendants have also posted similar videos to TikTok, with creator @cici_inthesky explaining her series of checks as she enters a hotel room.

She follows a routine similar to that of an Air New Zealand cabin crew member, but also makes sure that her peephole on the front door is closed. If it does not have a cover, she stuffs tissue paper inside it so that no one can see the inside.

She puts a bag in front of the door, and a washcloth on the door lock and then explains why in a comment.

“I put the bag in front of the door so no one can stick a cord under the door and open the security lock along with a towel as a backup.”

There have been several reported attacks on cabin crew in recent years. In 2019, a Canadian flight attendant was escorted back to her hotel room in Mexico and knocked unconscious. In 2017, a man was sentenced to 55 years in prison after sexually assaulting a crew member who checked into a hotel in Detroit.

Air New Zealand’s cabin crew member who made the since deleted video has been asked for comment, but has not yet responded.